White balance can be seen as an adjustment along an axis of BLUE to YELLOW tint on your images.

Often you have a the additional adjustment along a GREEN to MAGENTA axis too.

All this aims to is to get grey tones to really look grey, which has the “side effect” to correct the other colors too.

Given that you have a White balance setting on your camera that allows setting in Kelvin degrees you will be able to tune this “in camera” (permanently applied to JPG images, recorded as a retrievable setting amongt others in RAW files).

Here follows a set of images that should give a good view of what this means in practice.

Image data and Kelvin deg:s that was set for White balance in the camera below the image.



2010-02-11_15h39m32s_ND300-0712_025K, NIKON D300, 1/125 s, ISO 400, 0.00 eV, 70-300 mm, @ f/5.6, 86 mm, (35mm: 129 mm)

2500K

2010-02-11_15h39m10s_ND300-0707_029K, NIKON D300, 1/125 s, ISO 400, 0.00 eV, 70-300 mm, @ f/5.6, 86 mm, (35mm: 129 mm)

2900K

2010-02-11_15h38m54s_ND300-0702_035K, NIKON D300, 1/125 s, ISO 400, 0.00 eV, 70-300 mm, @ f/5.6, 86 mm, (35mm: 129 mm)

3500K

2010-02-11_15h38m34s_ND300-0697_042K, NIKON D300, 1/125 s, ISO 400, 0.00 eV, 70-300 mm, @ f/5.6, 86 mm, (35mm: 129 mm)

4200K

2010-02-11_15h38m10s_ND300-0692_053K, NIKON D300, 1/125 s, ISO 400, 0.00 eV, 70-300 mm, @ f/5.6, 86 mm, (35mm: 129 mm)

5300K

2010-02-11_15h37m52s_ND300-0687_067K, NIKON D300, 1/125 s, ISO 400, 0.00 eV, 70-300 mm, @ f/5.6, 86 mm, (35mm: 129 mm)

6870K

2010-02-11_15h37m12s_ND300-0682_100K, NIKON D300, 1/125 s, ISO 400, 0.00 eV, 70-300 mm, @ f/5.6, 86 mm, (35mm: 129 mm)

10000K

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